Interest Groups

2018 NPYM Annual Session

Time is set aside in our program for opportunities to share and learn, to go deeper with a smaller group than plenaries may allow, or to meet with those who share a special concern, or who need an alternative to the more general program. We encourage Friends to propose and to attend these Interest Groups as a chance for spiritual growth and building friendships. A list of scheduled Interest Groups with brief descriptions follows. This list is updated as new groups are proposed. We will announce new interest groups at regular intervals until 3 weeks prior to Annual Session.

PLEASE NOTE: where there are limits to participants, places will be assigned on a “first come, first served” basis. Later registrants may not be able to attend a limited participant Interest Group. You can indicate your preference upon registration (which can be updated at any time by returning to the registration site), or upon arrival at the University to check in (space permitting). We ask you to sign up as soon as possible so that appropriate spaces may be reserved. If no one signs up, leaders may choose to cancel their groups.

You should signify your desire to attend specific interest groups during registration by selecting from the list of available groups in the registration form. You may later log into your registration and change your selections, but noting the above-mentioned caveats.

If you would like to lead an interest group simply fill and submit the Interest Group Submission form.

NPYM AS Interest Groups

Thursday

IG-11. Friend-in-Residence: Brave Space

Vanessa Julye

In this space We seek to turn down the volume of the outside world, We amplify voices that fight to be heard elsewhere, We call each other to more truth and love.

Limit: 50 persons

IG-12. Nakani Native Program Committee

Jonathan Betz-Zall with Jeff Smith

The Nakani Native Program Committee has taken over for the AFSC's former Northwest Indian Program. We continue to support the Tribal Canoe Journey and also advocate for tribal treaty rights and promote good cultural relations among Native Americans and the larger society. This interest group will present Nakani's present activities and answer questions Friends may have.

Limit: 25 persons

IG-14. Feeling Isolated?

Sakre Edson

We will discuss how the book Being Quaker...A Journey Among Isolated Friends in the Northwest came to be, exploring one of the interviews in depth and exchanging ideas of how we in NPYM might better reach out and support our Isolated Friends. A limited amount of books will be available for purchase ($20). Isolated Friends are welcome to come and share their own experiences.

IG-15. Deepening with the Songs: Reflections on a Music Ministry

Anna Fritz

Anna Fritz is a Released Friend traveling with a music ministry under the care of Multnomah Monthly Meeting in Portland, Oregon. In the silence of worship, Anna offers some of her songs for cello and voice and some queries arising from them. The intention is to deepen with and reflect on what Spirit is awakening in us with these songs. We will worship, hear music ministry, sing together, share what arises, and have some time for discussion and questions.

Limit: 25 persons

IG-16. A Quaker Way of Living With Dying

Kate Jaramillo

Is there a uniquely Quaker approach to declining health, dying and death? How do Quaker beliefs, testimonies, and values inform our approach to the end of life? How does our faith help us face this ultimate reality of life? How can we prepare for death -- our own, in our families, in our meetings and worship groups? We will have the opportunity to address these questions individually, in small groups, and in large group with the goal of increasing our understanding about how our faith and practice affords us a way of living with dying. Bring something to write with and on.


Friday

IG-21. Seasoning and question time for Minute on renewed action against North Korea

Cimmeron Gillespie

This is a threshing session and discussion space to consider the Minute Regarding Consideration of US Renewed Military Action Against North Korea. This is a space for any questions and reflection

IG-22. Becoming Allies on Immigration & immigrant detention

Caroline Wildflower with Pedro Sosa, the Director of AFSC's Project Voice program in Oregon

Pedro will talk about his work on offering /Know Your Rights/ workshops and setting up Rapid Response Teams in a number of small towns and rural communities in Oregon and Washington. We will learn about places where allies work is important and needed, including the regional ICE (U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement) detention center in Tacoma.

Limit: 50 persons

IG-23. Affinity Group for Friends of Color

Vanessa Julye

This is an opportunity for People of Color to come together to share our Quaker experience and create a supportive community through worship, sharing and identifying ways to support each other.

Limit: 20 persons

IG-24. Affinity Group for European-American Friends Addressing Racism

Chuck Esser

This is an opportunity for Euro-Americans to come together to share our experience with addressing racism. We will create a supportive community through worship, talking and identifying ways to support each other.

Limit: 25 persons

IG-25. Electronic Communications in NPYM

Mary Klein with Nora J. Percival, NPYM Secretary

The agenda of this interest group will be: 1) Show-and-tell about electronic communications tools provided by Western Friend and the NPYM office. 2) Sharing of updates by participants about the uses of electronic communications in their monthly meetings. 3) General discussion about needs and best practices.

IG-26. Spiritual Unification

eric maya joy

  First, presentation of what Spiritual Unification means, where it comes from, and the process involved. This will include the very special gifts Friends (Quakers) have to offer the process, followed by questions and discussion (nurture sharing) with the entire group. Spiritual Unification is the process that sees humanity through these very challenging times we are now experiencing.

Limit: 30 persons

IG-27. Water, Global Development, and Effective Altruism

David Albert with , chair of Friendly Water for the World, & Drissia Ras, Administration and Operations Director, Friendly Water for the World. Drissia is a Muslim woman scientist from Morocco, who oversees Friendly Water projects around the world

More people have died from waterborne illnesses since 2000 than from all wars combined. A Quaker-based organization, Friendly Water for the World’s mission is to expand global access to low-cost clean water technologies and information about health and sanitation through knowledge-sharing, training, applied research, community-building, peacemaking, and efforts at sustainability. We empower communities abroad to take care of their own clean water needs, even as we empower people here to make a real difference. Same program both Friday and Saturday.

Limit: 40 persons

IG-28. Helping Heal Invisible Wounds of War - Quaker House (NC)

Kindra Bradley

Quaker House, in Fayetteville, NC, (home of Ft. Bragg) has been helping to heal the invisible wounds of war and working for greater peace since 1969. Come learn about moral injury, our programs, and those we serve.


Saturday

IG-13. Registration System Requirements

John Gotts with Kim Williams, Clint Weimeister, Nora Percival

This group will discuss the registration system needs for Annual Session and the pros and cons of replacing the current system.  

Limit: 50 persons

IG-31. Breaking Barriers Along the Border: How to be an ally for Latin@ immigrants and residents of the U.S.

Kaeli Frank with Berenice Fuentes, Claudia Cedeño-Fornos, Alondra Jaramillo, Devon Peterka

How to be an ally for Latin@ immigrants and residents of the U.S. A panel of three Latina young women from across the West Coast, speaking their truths of growing up combatting language and culture barriers in the U.S. Discussion will be centered around current governmental policy surrounding immigration and how individuals as well as religious groups can support and uplift the Latinx populations in our communities.

IG-32. Institutional Cultural Assessment, What is That?

Vanessa Julye with Chuck Esser

In 2017, Friends General Conference agreed to undergo an Internal Institutional Cultural Assessment. Come join us to hear what is involved in this assessment.

Limit: 30 persons

IG-33. Training Quaker Health Workers in Kenya

Nora Percival

I will report on my time in May and June in Chwele, a largely Quaker rural community in western Kenya, training health workers. After the presentation, there will be time for a discussion of community health issues in Kenya and possibilities for contributing to improving the lives of Quakers in that part of the world.

IG-34. Recognizing Ministries

Pablo Stanfield

We are all ministers, but we don't know what others are led to do. How can we support one another in our leadings and callings? Who needs special recognition? How do we recognize a ministry under the care of the MM? This is an important part of Appreciative Eldership, a job for the Monthly Meeting led by its elders.

IG-35. Care and Nurture of Worship Groups

Eugene Norcross-Renner with Eugene Norcross-Renner organized Lower Columbia Worship Group on the Long Beach Peninsula in 2008.

This will be an opportunity to raise questions, learn from one another’s experiences and equip ourselves to minister in a worship group setting. We can address how to begin a worship group, what maintains it as a living presence, and when a group may need to be laid down. This is intended to be a group conversation rather than a formal presentation.

Limit: 15 persons

IG-36. Why is the Society of Friends (Quakers) as a whole not growing in numbers, participation, and influence; at this time?

eric maya joy with Maia Wolff Ostrom

We will collectively explore this question. we are seeking continuing revelations on gifts Friends have to offer humanity today, and how to most effectively nurture and contribute those gifts?

Limit: 30 persons

IG-37. Water, Global Development, and Effective Altruism

David Albert with , clerk of Friendly Water for the World, & Drissia Ras, Administration and Operations Director, Friendly Water for the World. Drissia is a Muslim woman scientist from Morocco, who oversees Friendly Water projects around the world

More people have died from waterborne illnesses since 2000 than from all wars combined. A Quaker-based organization, Friendly Water for the World’s mission is to expand global access to low-cost clean water technologies and information about health and sanitation through knowledge-sharing, training, applied research, community-building, peacemaking, and efforts at sustainability. We empower communities abroad to take care of their own clean water needs, even as we empower people here to make a real difference. Same program both Friday and Saturday.

Limit: 40 persons

IG-38. Legislative Advocacy as a tool for Uprooting Racism

Noah Martin with Sam Merrill, Leni Skarin

Quaker Voice on Washington Public Policy will lead a discussion about the effectiveness of legislative advocacy on changing laws in the areas of criminal justice, economic justice, and environmental stewardship. All of these working group focus areas have a component of working for racial justice since people of color are disproportionately affected by public policies that marginalize and disadvantage them. Strategies to be discussed include persistent volunteer lobbying efforts, building coalitions with other advocacy groups, and building relationships with legislators and staff. All strategies have resulted in significant success during the 2018 legislative session.

IG-39. Uprooting Systemic Oppression

Sea Gabriel with Cims Gillespie

In this Worship Sharing and Discussion-based group, we will inspect our roots of oppression (race and otherwise) within our own psyches, and how we might begin to move forward with greater clarity, integrity, and compassion.

Limit: 27 persons